Italy – Rome

Veteran Stories

>> Hello. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> Wow. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> Tell him ... Ask him, Korea War broke out after World War II, very shortly after. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> So ... [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> So, he must ... [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> He must have been tired of war, seeing war, so why did he volunteer to go to Korea? >> Okay. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> Thank you very much, yes. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> What is that? [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> The Land of the Morning Calm. >> Of the Morning Calm, okay. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> Samsung, IKEA. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> There were Italian ... [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> Ask him if he ... Has he ever seen pictures of modern Korea? >> Okay. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> No. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> Tell him, when he came back ... [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] [ Chatter ] >> ... because there were so few nurses and doctors ... >> Mm-hmm. >> ... remember how many there were, very few? That when he came back ... [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> ... did they keep in touch? >> Okay. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> No. >> No? >> No. >> No. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> What kind of patients did he treat in Korea? >> Okay. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> Like women, children, old ... [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> Soldiers? [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> Ethiopia. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> Did he ... Does he know about other medical units from Sweden, Norway? >> Okay. >> Denmark? [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> NORMASH, NORMASH. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> Denmark. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> Only Italian doctors in his unit. >> No, I know. I know, but did he know about the other doctors? [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> Did they ever meet him? [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> Had he ever met them because ... Tell him because when I went to Sweden and Norway, they said that they went to each other's places like the Norwegian doctor went to the Swedish hospital to visit. >> Mm-hmm. >> So has he ever visited other hospitals? >> Okay. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> Just Sweden. >> Sweden. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> Can you tell him to tell us maybe a story that he remembers like a touching story, a moving story about a patient ... >> Okay. Okay. >> from the hospital, not necessarily personal, but just from the hospital. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> In a gist, what did he say in a gist? >> In a gist? >> In a gist. >> What is an a gist? >> Gist, like the gist of what he said. >> Oh. >> Summarize briefly what he said. >> So he basically described the hospital and the patient. He mentions the sicknesses that existed like it was lepers. >> Leprosy. >> Leprosy, and he also ... Yeah. He mentions leprosy. >> [INAUDIBLE]. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> Yeah. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> Wasn't it in mice or something? Or ... >> No, it's in the Bible something. It's ... Now what did he do when he came back. How was his life after he came back from Korea? >> Should I ask him that. >> Yes. >> Okay. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> Normal, like it was before. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> Ask him what ... he must ... Is he proud of his contribution, his service? [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> What did he say? >> So yes, he is proud of fighting for Korea because ... [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> Yeah. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> Yeah. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> When did he get married? >> Okay. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> How did he meet her? [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> Oh, they knew each other when they were young. >> Yeah. He said that she was older than he was by 6 years. >> Oh, wow. How did they meet? >> They met in Turin. That's all he said. >> Ooh, la, la. >> Ooh, la, la. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> Mm-hmm, so he basically has a total of seven kids, two girls and two boys in second marriage, and the one boy died in his first marriage, and I believe in the first marriage there was another boy. >> Oh, wow. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> So he ... [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> So he basically ... He returned back home poor just like ... >> Just like he was before. >> Just like he was before, and he's very interested in history, so rather than getting whatever, $10 million or whatever, and he also said ... Yeah. That's what he said. >> Ask him finally if there's any pictures that he wants to show us. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> Any special one, special, special? [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> Ask him when his birthday is. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> Oh, the 20th of August. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> What year? >> Oh, 1924. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> And then when was it, his birthday? >> August 20th, 1925. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> You? Really. No guitar, piano. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> You have harmonica? You have? Can you play for us? [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> Wow. Wow. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> What did he say? >> This is ... he's ... This is yours. >> Ooh. Mine? [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> I'm checking. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> I don't know if he wants you to take it or what or I don't know if he meant that. >> I don't think so. >> I don't think so. I wouldn't do it because saying take it could also be just to look at .. >> Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. >> So yeah, so ... >> Okay. Let's go. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> Okay, concert. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] >> Very good, grazie. >> Grazie mille. >> Grazie, grazie. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE]

>> [FOREIGN LANGUAGE].

>> So he’s the colonel lieutenant of the …

>> Claudio …

>> … Claudio …

>> … de Felici …

>> … de Felici …

>> [FOREIGN LANGUAGE].

>> … of the military corp …

>> Italian Red Cross.

>> … of the Italian Red Cross.

>> And we are in [FOREIGN LANGUAGE].

>> Okay. We are in the [INAUDIBLE].

>> [FOREIGN LANGUAGE].

>> We are in the room of the Red Cross where the personnel departed for the war in 1964.

>> [FOREIGN LANGUAGE].

>> October 16th, 1951.

>> [FOREIGN LANGUAGE].

>> So the hospital was operated from December 1951 to 1954 …

>> [FOREIGN LANGUAGE].

>> … and the personnel …

>> [FOREIGN LANGUAGE].

>> … were repatriated in …

>> [FOREIGN LANGUAGE].

>> … until the 10th of January …

>> [FOREIGN LANGUAGE].

>> … of 1955.

>> [FOREIGN LANGUAGE].

>> Mm-hmm. The hospital was composed of paramedics …

>> [FOREIGN LANGUAGE].

>> … medical officials …

>> [FOREIGN LANGUAGE].

>> … and …

>> Paramedic.

>> Paramedics, yeah.

>> [FOREIGN LANGUAGE].

>> Voluntary nurses …

>> [FOREIGN LANGUAGE].

>> … and Korean personnel …

>> [FOREIGN LANGUAGE].

>> … for the services …

>> Of the hospital.

>> … yeah, of the hospital.

>> [FOREIGN LANGUAGE].

>> The Korean authorities …

>> [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] the American authority.

>> … and the American authorities …

>> [FOREIGN LANGUAGE].

>> … of the …

>> [FOREIGN LANGUAGE].

>> … oh, of the coalition …

>> [FOREIGN LANGUAGE].

>> … oh, appreciated …

>> [FOREIGN LANGUAGE].

>> … the work …

>> [FOREIGN LANGUAGE].

>> … the work done by the Italian personnel …

>> [FOREIGN LANGUAGE].

>> … of hospital number 68, yeah.

>> Why was it called the hospital number 68?

>> I don’t remember.

>> [FOREIGN LANGUAGE].

>> Sixty-eight …

>> [FOREIGN LANGUAGE]. Now I don’t remember in this moment, but there is [FOREIGN LANGUAGE]. I don’t remember now because …

>> I’m very curious.

>> … this number.

>> I’m curious. I want to know, yeah.

>> [FOREIGN LANGUAGE].

>> Okay.

>> My name is Claudio de Felici. I am a lieutenant colonel of Italian Red Cross, and now we are in [INAUDIBLE] of headquarter of Italian Red Cross. [FOREIGN LANGUAGE].

>> How many people went to Korea?

>> One hundred people went to Korea to serve the fine hospital number 68 during the Korean War, and the hospital stayed in Korea from November 5 [FOREIGN LANGUAGE] 1951 to 1954 December. Italy went. They sent the hospital in Korea. Italy was not a part of the United Nation, but Italy is member wholly de NATO. Mamma mia.

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    Memorial Site

    The Italian Republic participated in the Korean War from November 1951 to January 1955. Italy was one of the five countries that provided medical support. President Luigi Einaudi sent the 68th Red Cross Hospital.

    In total, Italy deployed 128 medical professionals.

    The memorial in Italy is a plaque located inside the Red Cross headquarters in Rome, where a ceremony was held in 1951 before sending men and women to service in Korea.